Think outside the box with Christmas packaging

Before you throw away your household’s Christmas packaging, take a second to ensure you have no intention of ever selling the goods. If you do, close the lid of your recycling bin and slowly back away… What does your recycling bin look like the week after Christmas? If Santa has been to visit, it will probably be full of cardboard, plastic, polystyrene and other packaging in which toys or electronic goods are sold. You’re doing your bit for the environment, you may think, as well as clearing the house of debris. However, what if you decide to resell one of Santa’s gifts a few months or years down the line? You may think that you wouldn’t sell a gift, but Santa and well-meaning friends and relatives often give ‘unused’ and ‘unwanted’ gifts. And where there’s an unwanted or rarely used gift, you’ll always find a potential buyer lurking nearby, happy to snap up a bargain. Put yourself in their shoes. If you’re buying second hand, do you like to have the original packaging and instructions? Do you like to have all the leads and components? Do you like the feeling that what you’re buying is new? (Even if technically it’s just new to you). Would you pay more for something that looks new? Chances are, you’ve said yes to all of those questions. So what exactly do you need to hold onto and why? The box It’s a well-known fact that children often get more fun out of the box a toy arrives in than the toy itself. However, if you’re serious about selling the toy once a child has grown out of it, consider keeping the box out of your children’s way or ensuring they don’t get too rough and tumble with it. The packaging No matter what the item, there will be excess packaging, ranging from polystyrene to plastic bags to bubble wrap to cardboard. This serves the purpose of protecting items from damage in transit. A handy way to ensure that you repack goods you are selling in the same way they were packed when you first opened the box is to take a photo. It is a good idea to hold on to everything from cable ties to bits of tape used to keep hinged parts of an item closed while they are in transit. However, please remember that plastic bags and small components can be a hazard for children, so stow the box with the packaging inside of it out of harm’s way as soon as you can. The instructions Whether it’s learning how to open the battery compartment or locating the ‘on’ switch, instruction manuals, sheets, CDs and booklets play an important part in the life of any electrical item or toy. If you lose them, remember they can usually be downloaded from the manufacturer’s website. The receipt If you’re selling an item within the lifetime of its warranty, handing over the original receipt may be of help to your buyer in case anything goes wrong with the item. Leads, chargers etc Make sure you include the correct leads, chargers, plugs and AC adaptors when reselling an item. Apart from looking good, it’s important for safety reaons. What does your recycling bin look like the week after Christmas? If Santa has been to visit, it will probably be full of cardboard, plastic, polystyrene and other packaging in which toys or electronic goods are sold. Having everything that arrived in the box can help with selling on goods You’re doing your bit for the environment, you may think, as well as clearing the house of debris. However, what if you decide to resell one of Santa’s gifts a few months or years down the line? You may think that you wouldn’t sell a gift, but Santa and well-meaning friends and relatives often give ‘unused’ and ‘unwanted’ gifts. And where there’s an unwanted or rarely used gift, you’ll always find a potential buyer lurking nearby, happy to snap up a bargain. Put yourself in their shoes. If you’re buying second hand, do you like to have the original packaging and instructions? Do you like to have all the leads and components? Do you like the feeling that what you’re buying is new? (Even if technically it’s just new to you). Would you pay more for something that looks new? Chances are, you’ve said yes to all of those questions. So what exactly do you need to hold onto and why? The box It’s a well-known fact that children often get more fun out of the box a toy arrives in than the toy itself. However, if you’re serious about selling the toy once a child has grown out of it, consider keeping the box out of your children’s way or ensuring they don’t get too rough and tumble with it. The packaging No matter what the item, there will be excess packaging, ranging from polystyrene to plastic bags to bubble wrap to cardboard. This serves the purpose of protecting items from damage in transit. A handy way to ensure that you repack goods you are selling in the same way they were packed when you first opened the box is to take a photo. It is a good idea to hold on to everything from cable ties to bits of tape used to keep hinged parts of an item closed while they are in transit. However, please remember that plastic bags and small components can be a hazard for children, so stow the box with the packaging inside of it out of harm’s way as soon as you can. The instructions Whether it’s learning how to open the battery compartment or locating the ‘on’ switch, instruction manuals, sheets, CDs and booklets play an important part in the life of any electrical item or toy. If you lose them, remember they can usually be downloaded from the manufacturer’s website. The receipt If you’re selling an item within the lifetime of its warranty, handing over the original receipt may be of help to your buyer in case anything goes wrong with the item. Leads, chargers etc Make sure you include the correct leads, chargers, plugs and AC adaptors when reselling an item. Apart from looking good, it’s important for safety reaons. #Christmas #SellingTips