Stuff and nonsense: do you have too much stuff?

When you look around your home, is every available space taken up with some object or other? Do you simply have too much ‘stuff’? Act now before you become buried under a mountain of your own clutter Make your home a clutter-free zone by selling belongings (Photo: Sean MacEntee) If you have ever taken a break away for a few days, only to return home and notice, for the first time, the countless bits and bobs you have strewn around your house, then it is probably time to declutter. Fiona Wilson, owner of interior design consultancy Upstairs Downstairs, has seen her fair share of cluttered homes through her involvement in the RTE television series ‘Desperate Houses’. She explains that clutter is too much of any one thing. “Too many newspapers, too many books, too many pieces of furniture, anything that there is an excess of. It is also anything that is interfering with the way you function within a space – in your kitchen, or in your home in general. If you can’t actually use the space – say your counter tops are full of stuff – that’s clutter, and it is imposing on what you’re trying to do.” Wilson says clutter is an issue for different households to varying degrees. “Obviously not everybody gets themselves into the situation of people we have had on the [RTE] show, but it’s way more common than people think.” Some people keep those rooms that visitors will see clutter free, eg the living room or kitchen. “I just think people are very busy and don’t have time,” says Wilson, adding that if the task of dealing with the clutter becomes too great, it’s easier just to leave it. She says she has noticed that clutter actually starts to become invisible to people, who change the way they live to fit in around it. “They get so used to it they can’t see it. It’s a bit like putting on weight; you notice the first few pounds, but as you get bigger and bigger, you just get used to it.” People also tend to partake in a ‘musical chairs’ of clutter. “They’ll say, ‘I’ll tackle this room’ and move the stuff to another room,” says Wilson. The only way to deal with clutter is to remove the offending items from the house altogether, and Wilson strongly encourages reusing and recycling wherever possible. She notes that previous generations would have tried to sell or reuse items rather than throw them out, and says that, in Canada, where she lived for 14 years, people still don’t throw things out. “If you don’t want something you put it outside your house knowing that someone will pick it up; it won’t get put in the garbage.” Wilson believes that selling such items through DoneDeal is a win-win situation, as buyers can see photos of the items for sale. “One person needs it cheaply and the other is trying to get rid of it. Obviously, making some money out of it would be great, and this provides an added incentive for people to get rid of things.” If you have ever taken a break away for a few days, only to return home and notice, for the first time, the countless bits and bobs you have strewn around your house, then it is probably time to declutter. Fiona Wilson, owner of interior design consultancy Upstairs Downstairs, has seen her fair share of cluttered homes through her involvement in the RTE television series ‘Desperate Houses’. She explains that clutter is too much of any one thing. “Too many newspapers, too many books, too many pieces of furniture, anything that there is an excess of. It is also anything that is interfering with the way you function within a space – in your kitchen, or in your home in general. If you can’t actually use the space – say your counter tops are full of stuff – that’s clutter, and it is imposing on what you’re trying to do.” Wilson says clutter is an issue for different households to varying degrees. “Obviously not everybody gets themselves into the situation of people we have had on the [RTE] show, but it’s way more common than people think.” Some people keep those rooms that visitors will see clutter free, eg the living room or kitchen. “I just think people are very busy and don’t have time,” says Wilson, adding that if the task of dealing with the clutter becomes too great, it’s easier just to leave it. She says she has noticed that clutter actually starts to become invisible to people, who change the way they live to fit in around it. “They get so used to it they can’t see it. It’s a bit like putting on weight; you notice the first few pounds, but as you get bigger and bigger, you just get used to it.” People also tend to partake in a ‘musical chairs’ of clutter. “They’ll say, ‘I’ll tackle this room’ and move the stuff to another room,” says Wilson. The only way to deal with clutter is to remove the offending items from the house altogether, and Wilson strongly encourages reusing and recycling wherever possible. She notes that previous generations would have tried to sell or reuse items rather than throw them out, and says that, in Canada, where she lived for 14 years, people still don’t throw things out. “If you don’t want something you put it outside your house knowing that someone will pick it up; it won’t get put in the garbage.” Wilson believes that selling such items through DoneDeal is a win-win situation, as buyers can see photos of the items for sale. “One person needs it cheaply and the other is trying to get rid of it. Obviously, making some money out of it would be great, and this provides an added incentive for people to get rid of things.” #Declutter #HouseampDIY